Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review https://journals.umt.edu.pk/index.php/CCPR <p>Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review – CCPR Founded in 2017, the CCPR is a peer-reviewed forum devoted to research, assessment, and practice. CCPR is a bi-annual journal that includes original research articles, review articles, and single case studies.</p> Institute of Clinical Psychology, University of Management and Technology en-US Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review 2412-5253 Child Sexual Abuse and Unresolved Trauma: A Case Study https://journals.umt.edu.pk/index.php/CCPR/article/view/2267 <p>Child sexual abuse is one of the most traumatic incidents that can alter the course of life of an individual. This article highlights the case of a 52-year-old man who was having difficulties in managing his anger, with complaints of anger management issues and dealing with repetitive and intrusive thoughts. A thorough investigation revealed that the client had been a victim of sexual abuse for years during his childhood, and all the symptoms stemmed from unresolved conflicts of the past trauma. A comprehensive management plan including behavioral, emotional, and cognitive strategies was devised. Pre and post -management assessments indicated a marked improvement in the client's symptoms. This case focuses on the role of parents and society in providing an empathizing network to the victims, and a need to educate the children about sexual education and rights.</p> Rabeea Irfan Copyright (c) 2023 Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review 2023-12-28 2023-12-28 5 2 10.32350/ccpr.52.02 Hypersensitive Narcissism, Social Media Usage, and Selfitis Behaviour among University Students: Mediating Role of Self-Esteem https://journals.umt.edu.pk/index.php/CCPR/article/view/2668 <p>The current study aimed to examine the relationship of hypersensitive narcissism, social media usage, and selfitis behaviour along with the mediating role of self-esteem among university students in Pakistan. Correlational research design was used and the sample was selected through the purposive sampling technique. The sample comprised (N=200) university students with a mean age of 21.45, SD=2.42. Further, the sample was separated into (n=100) male and (n=100) female participants.&nbsp; Standard instruments such as Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale (HSNS), Selfitis Behaviour Scale (SBS), Social Media Affinity Scale (SMAS), and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) were used to collect the data. The results indicated that hypersensitive narcissism, social media usage, and selfitis behaviour have a significant positive correlation, while they exhibit a non-significant correlation with self-esteem. The findings also revealed that hypersensitive narcissism and social media usage positively predict selfitis behaviour. It was also determined that hypersensitive narcissism, social media usage, selfitis behaviour, and self-esteem have the same impact on both genders. Self-esteem was taken as a mediator but the results showed that it did not mediate between these variables. The study may assist future educators, mental health professionals, and policymakers in recognizing and addressing such risk factors to promote a healthier academic and social environment. The study may further contribute to discussions related to digital well-being and the need for guidelines to ensure that social media platforms are used in ways that enhance rather than diminish the self-esteem of university students.</p> Syed Wasi Hassan Asad Javed Copyright (c) 2023 Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review 2024-05-14 2024-05-14 5 2 10.32350//ccpr.52.01 Parenting Styles, Academic Self-efficacy And Decision-Making Power Among University Students https://journals.umt.edu.pk/index.php/CCPR/article/view/5657 <p>This study aims to examine the association between parenting styles, academic self-efficacy, and decision-making power among university students. The sample included 200 undergraduate and postgraduate students (100 men and 100 women) aged 18-28 years. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants. They were surveyed using a short version of the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ), Academic Self-Efficacy Scale, and Decision-Making Collaboration Scale. Correlation analysis was employed to assess the relationships between variables. Independent sample t-test was used to examine gender differences and regression analysis was used to identify the predictor variables for decision-making power. The results indicated a positive relationship between authoritative parenting styles and decision-making power and academic self-efficacy and decision-making power among university students (p &lt; .05). Regression analysis indicated authoritative parenting, permissive parenting, curricular activities, utilisation of resources, and adjustment as predictors of decision-making power among university students. The results of an independent sample t-test showed significant gender differences between authoritarian parenting, curricular activities, and time management. Based on the results, the study concluded that the decision-making abilities of university students are significantly shaped by parenting styles, academic self-efficacy, and factors such as curricular activities and resource utilisation. Further, gender differences in certain aspects highlight the need for tailored interventions. Overall, this research provides valuable insights for fostering holistic student development.</p> Sonia Naeem Roqaiya Afzal Ammal Ahmad Copyright (c) 2023 Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review 2024-05-14 2024-05-14 5 2 10.32350//ccpr.52.03 Compensatory Health Beliefs, Food Preferences and Sedentary Behaviors in Patients with Diabetes Type II https://journals.umt.edu.pk/index.php/CCPR/article/view/3085 <p>This study investigated the relationship between compensatory health beliefs, food preferences, and sedentary behaviors in patients with diabetes type II. It was hypothesized that there is likely to be a relationship between compensatory health beliefs, sedentary behavior, and food preferences in patients with diabetes type II. It was also hypothesized that sedentary behaviors predict the influence of compensatory health beliefs and food preferences in patients with diabetes type II. Descriptive correlational research design was used and the sample consists of 200 patients from which 30 patients were removed after data screening from diabetic units of public sector hospitals of Lahore. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that age, no, of children, work status, and duration of diabetes were positively correlated with compensatory health belief. There was a positive correlation among gender, family system, and weight with food preferences. The demographics variables i.e. gender and monthly income were positively correlated with sedentary behaviors. Marital status was positively correlated with the study variables. Age and height were negatively correlated with compensatory health beliefs, food preferences and sedentary behavior. Independent sample t-test, one-way-anova, and hierarchical regression were also employed to assess the mean differences and prediction of the hypothesis. Hierarchical regression showed that there was no significant prediction among the variables. The findings of the research may lay the ground for further research studies.</p> Aroosh Amir Khan Fatima Kamran Copyright (c) 2023 Clinical and Counselling Psychology Review 2024-05-14 2024-05-14 5 2 10.32350//ccpr.52.04